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Race Equity Trends > Health

Healthcare Access by Race/Ethnicity

Differences by race/ethnicity exist for adults with a primary care provider

Adults with primary care are significantly more likely to receive routine annual preventative visits and screenings, diagnostic screenings, cancer screenings, diabetes care, and health counseling, such as smoking cessation.1

Overall, 18.9% of Lancaster County residents report not having a primary care provider. However, disparities exist by race and ethnicity.

  • 15.4% of those who identify as White report not having a primary care provider.
  • 23.9% of those who identify as American Indian or Alaska Native report not having a primary care provider.
  • 25.9% of those who identify as Black or African American report not having a primary care provider.
  • 34.0% of those who identify as Asian or Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander report not having a primary care provider.
  • 37.6% of those who identify as Latino/a or Hispanic report not having a primary care provider.
  • 21.0% of those who identify as being of Two or More Races report not having a primary care provider.
Notes

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Nebraska DHHS.

Percent within race or ethnicity based on number of adults 18 and older without primary care provider by population size for race or ethnicity.

Footnotes
  1. Levine, David M., Landon, Bruce E., and Jeffrey A. Linder. (2019). Quality and experience of outpatient care in the United States for adults with or without primary care. JAMA Internal Medicine, 179(3) 363-372.