Explore the Data

Race Equity Trends > Health

Early and Adequate Prenatal Care by Race and Ethnicity for Lancaster County 2019-2021

Disparities exist in access and utilization of adequate prenatal care

Early and adequate prenatal care is defined as care beginning in the first four months of pregnancy and receiving at least 80% of prenatal care visits or examinations recommended by health care professionals.1

Inadequate prenatal care has been found to be associated with poor birth outcomes. Compared to adequate care, inadequate care is associated with increased risk of prematurity, stillbirth, and higher infant mortality.2

Overall, 75.6% of expectant mothers in Lancaster County received at least adequate prenatal care between 2019 and 2021.

  • 77.7% of those who identified as White received at least adequate prenatal care.
  • 70.6% of those who identified as Latino/a or Hispanic received at least adequate prenatal care.
  • 69.6% of those who identified as Asian received at least adequate prenatal care.
  • 64.6% of those who identified as Black or African American received at least adequate prenatal care.
  • 58.2% of those who identified as American Indian or Alaska Native received at least adequate prenatal care.
  • 70.2% of those who identified as Some Other Race received at least adequate prenatal care.
Note

Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department, Online Vital Statistics Reporting System. National data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Vital Statistics System.

Footnotes
  1. Martin, Joyce A., and Michelle J.K. Osterman. (2023). Changes in prenatal care utilization: United States, 2019-2021. National Vital Statistics Report 75(4).
  2. Partridge, S., Balayla, J., Holcroft, C. A., & Abenhaim, H. A. (2012). Inadequate prenatal care utilization and risks of infant mortality and poor birth outcome: a retrospective analysis of 28,729,765 U.S. deliveries over 8 years. American journal of perinatology, 29(10), 787–793.