Safety

People decide where to live based on opportunities to satisfy basic needs: safety (93%), jobs (83%), and housing (83%).1 People want to live in communities where they feel physically free from harm. Harm may occur through intentional victimization, as well as through accidents and health crises. In the United States, victimization rates since the early 1990s have declined.2 Urbanized areas now have lower overall injury-related mortality rates among all age groups than do more rural areas.3

Although people in Lincoln do come to harm, on the whole, Lincoln is a safe place to live. Lincoln has less crime than other similarly-sized communities. Persons living in Lincoln report feeling safe most or all of the time, traffic crash injuries are decreasing, and medical and fire services are effective. There has been a substantial decline in children who have been removed from their homes for their safety, for reasons such as neglect, parental drug use, and substandard/unsafe housing. However, Lincoln has seen an increase in the juvenile arrest rate for drug violations, when compared to the national rate.

Lincoln’s Crime Rate Remains Low

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Lincoln's Juvenile Arrest Rate for Drug Violations is Increasing

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People in Lincoln Report Feeling Safe

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Medical Emergency Response Trails City Goals, but Property Value Saved is High

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Domestic and Child Violence Rates Have Been Fairly Steady

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The Percentage of Children in Out-of-Home Placements has Declined Substantially, and is Nearly the Same as the National Average

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Footnotes

1. Citro, C. F., & Michael, R. T. (Eds.). (1995). Measuring poverty: A new approach. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.
2. Lauritsen, J. L., & Rezey, M. L. (2013). Measuring the prevalence of crime with the National Crime Victimization Survey. Technical Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice.
3. Myers, S. R., Branas, C. C., Nance, M. L., Kallan, M. J., Wiebe, D. J., & Carr, B. G. (2011). Are major cities the safest places in the US? Annals of Emergency Medicine, 58(4, Supplement), S223. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2011.06.164
4. PytlikZillig, L Fairchild, A (2016). Taking Charge 2016: A Study of the Strategic Budgeting Priorities of the Residents of Lincoln, Nebraska Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Public Policy Center.
5. Statistical Briefing Book, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.
6. Although juvenile arrest rates may largely reflect juvenile behavior, many other factors ca n affect the magnitude of these rates, such as the attitudes of citizens toward crime, the policies of local law enforcement agencies, and the policies of other components of the justice system.
7. Data for domestic violence offenses are not available for only the City of Lincoln; therefore Lancaster County data are used.
8. Lesnick, J., Goerge, R. M., Smithgall, C., & Gwynne, J. (2010). Reading on grade level in third grade: How is it related to high school performance and college enrollment? Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago.
9. All data is point-in-time. Lancaster County data 2006 through 2009 for December 30 ; 2011 and later for June 30. National data is for September 30 of each year.
10. These figures exclude children who are removed from homes due to juvenile justice interventions.
11. Figures do not total to 100% since children may be removed from the parental home for multiple reasons.

 
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